When it comes to plants, there are a lot of different options to choose from, especially when you’re a lazy gardener. However, just because you’ve got a black thumb doesn’t mean you’ve gotta be stuck with boring plants. I’ve found that there are a few black indoor houseplants out there that can actually tolerate mild abuse and still flourish. Here are a few of my favorite black plants that I’ve been able to keep alive easily.

1: Rubber Plant (Ficus elastic)

black plants indoor guide
Credit: The Longevity Garden

The rubber plant (Ficus elastica) is a fast-growing, easy to care for plant. It can be kept indoors in a sunny spot or outdoors in warmer climates. The rubber tree is tolerant of drought and can grow up to 10 feet tall. The leaves are glossy green and the flowers are small and white, though flowering is rare.

Tips for keeping it alive: 

My Indian rubber plant has done really well in a terra cotta pot and can take a lot of abuse due to my ADHD forgetfulness. Just put a water dish under the pot to ensure it stays alive, especially during the winter if it’s inside near a vent.

2: Chinese Jade (Sinocrassula yunnanensis)

black plants and flowers that are easy to grow
Credit: Walawala Studio

The Chinese jade (Sinocrassula yunnanensis) is a slow-growing, easy to care for plant that thrives indoors or outdoors. The jade grows up to 12 feet tall and has glossy, dark green leaves. The flowers are small and green, but they’re usually pollinated by bees.

Tips for keeping it alive: 

Since Chinese Jade is a succulent it doesn’t need much care or attention. Don’t overwater it!

3: Black Velvet Alocasia (Alocasia reginula)

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Credit: The Odd Frond

The black velvet alocasia (Alocasia reginula) is a fast-growing, easy to care for plant that can be kept indoors or outdoors. I’ve had one in my bathroom for years, but it’s still a dark green instead of black. Apparently, it only turns black when it’s super-duper happy so if yours ends up like mine and leans more green than black, don’t worry. It’ll come around eventually.

Tips for keeping it alive: 

Put it in a humid spot because they love water. Bathrooms with indirect sunlight are the best.

4. Black Magic Taro (Colocasia esculenta)

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Credit: Till and Sia Source

The black magic taro is a variation of the elephant ear plant and can grow up to three feet high. It’s one of the biggest black plants I’ve seen!

Tips for keeping it alive:

Water it frequently and fertilize it every two weeks in the spring and summer. They love love love humidity so if you’re forgetful, put a water dish underneath it with some pebbles.

5. Raven ZZ (Zamioculcas zamiifolia)

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Credit: The Nodes

One of my hardiest goth plants around! Raven ZZ can handle being forgotten about for a few weeks before it starts to droop. Knock on wood, but I’ve never had one die yet…at worst they just don’t sprout any more leaves.

Tips for keeping it alive:

Raven ZZs don’t need a lot of light so pop it somewhere that gets some regular light, but not much. Mine lives in my office which only has aquarium lights and a half-window.

6. Black Beauty Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

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Credit: Punflowers

Okay, to be fair these are on of the black plants and flowers that probably do better outdoors than in and they’re pretty tricky to get fully black (they’re typically a deep, velvety red) but they’re SO cool. I’ve just started growing a set myself and they’re going to be so pretty when they’re done.

Tips for keeping it alive:

Water them regularly and fertilize them in the spring and summer. Treat them like any regular sunflower and plant them in bright light.

7. Black Coral Snake Plant (Sansevieria)

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Credit: Faiths Florist

I just love these because of their alternate names – “viper’s tongue” and “mother-in-law tongue” (for the record, my Mother in Law is AWESOME so it never applies in our house). Snake plants are so stupidly easy to raise because they actively DO NOT want your attention. Put them in a corner and water them when you remember, but only a little. The black coral variety is typically a mix of green and black stripes so it’s a really interesting visual to put in a room to catch the eye.

Tips for keeping it alive:

This is one that actively wants your abuse. If you overwater it, the roots will turn to mush (believe me, I’ve done it many times). If you do end up getting mushy roots, clip the leaf as close to the root as possible (where it’s still crunchy, don’t allow any mushy leaf to come with you) and propagate it. I’ve had luck with both soil and water so whatever is handiest should be fine.

Troubleshooting Your Black Plants Indoor Issues

My plant isn’t turning black: This is most likely due to a nutrient or water deficiency. It takes a lot of work for your plant to get that rich shade of black so if your guy is stuck at green, try upping the fertilizer, water routine, or move it to a different spot with more or less light. It’s hard to give specifics since each plant is different, but start with the plant food as triage, and if that doesn’t work move to changing your water routine. If that doesn’t work, give it a new place in your home and see if that helps.

My plant’s leaves are curling: This could be a sign of a water or nutrient deficiency. Make sure to water them well and add fertilizer during the growing season (spring and summer). If that doesn’t solve the problem, it might be time to move the plants or give them some new light.

My plant isn’t growing new sprouts: This is typically because it doesn’t have enough resources to devote to new growth. Give it some plant food and up the water routine.

My plant has a bunch of gnats: This is typically a sign that there is something wrong with the soil. Gnats love to eat decaying soil so there’s something going on with the stuff in your plant pot. Check the pH, water it well, and add fertilizer if necessary. I use these traps around my front porch for gnats when they’re an issue.

My plant’s leaves or stems are drooping: This could be a sign of a water or nutrient deficiency. Make sure to water them well and add fertilizer during the growing season (spring and summer). If that doesn’t solve the problem, it might be time to move the plants or give them some new light. 

Final Thoughts

These are a few of my favorite black plants that are super easy to grow. If you want to add some life to your garden, then these plants are perfect for you. I hope this black plants indoor guide has been helpful…I’ve also got a few other favorites in my goth plant guide so check it out!